Modeling of Effective Thermal Conductivity and Viscosity of Carbon Structured Nanofluid

Document Type: Original Research Paper

Authors

1 Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Shahrood, Shahrood, I.R. Iran

2 Nanotechnology Reasearch Institute, University of Sistan and Baluchestan, Zahedan, I.R. Iran

3 Nanotechnology Research Center, Research Institute of Petroleum Industry, I.R. Iran

4 Chemical Engineering Department, University of Tehran, Tehran, I.R. Iran

Abstract

This paper was aimed to address the modeling of effective thermal conductivity and viscosity of carbon structured nanofluids. Response surface methodology, D_optimal design (DOD) was employed to assess the main and interactive effects of temperature (T) and weight percentage (wt %) to model effective thermal conductivity and viscosity of multi wall and single wall carbon nanotube, CVD and RGO Graphene and nanoporous Graphene sheet. The second-order polynomial regression model was proposed for effective thermal conductivity and viscosity as a function of relevant investigated parameters. Effective thermal conductivity and viscosity of nanofluids measured using an accurate transient short hot wire system and a viscometer, respectively. nanofluids was prepared using two-step method and showed a desirable stability. In general, Graphene nanosheets have more effective thermal conductivity and viscosity compared to carbon nanotube because of variation in shape and likely size.

Keywords


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